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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 244 (some duplicates have been removed)
often our conversations about these issues are exclusively engineering and physical science kinds of questions. those matter, no doubt. they're fundamental, but there's a social dimension to this as well, which neighborhoods are affected, which individual people are affected, and it's predictable. >> fascinating, zone "a" ev evacua evacuated, low-lying residents there were twice as likely to be residents of. >>> i want to bring in ed markey, co-sponsor of the only climate bill to ever pass the chamber of congress. congressman, what is your reaction to the stunning absence of this issue that you worked so hard on and labored over and ground out a large bill with tons of technical details to carve votes on and it's now disappeared from the political conversation? >> well, i think that -- i think that mother nature decided that she was going to inject it into this election. if it wasn't going to be raised in any of the debates, then she was going to find a way of having this be discussed. and so this election for next tuesday is now framed. it's mother nature versus the unrestrained
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> hello, everybody. i'm melisilissa rehberger. wall street will be back in business tomorrow. they will reopen wednesday after hurricane sandy shut down trading for two days. the organizers of the new york city marathon say they are going ahead with sunday's race despite the damage caused by sandy. meanwhile, ubs announced it will cut up to 10,000 jobs by 2015. they say they're tryin
that this is all bogus science? who -- are they phonies? are they quacks? >> there are different motivations. some people don't want to hear about global warming because it's bad news and there's enough bad news in the world and everybody has plenty to worry about anyway. some people don't want to hear about it because it gets in the way of their economic interests, those would be the fossil fuel companies, for instance. and some people are just generally skeptical and don't like experts, and, frankly, i don't like experts all the time myself either. but these are the facts. every academy of science of every major country in the world has said this is happening. it's happening now. it's only going to get worse until we start taking actions to stem the emissions that are causing the problem. but in the meantime, this stuff is going to be happening even if we get emissions under control for some time, for decades, so we have to learn how to adapt better, how to prepare for such a potential disaster, how to mitigate their damages. >> we don't have any high ground to go to in this where we have 6 bill
. something i deal with as a science reporter is the fear of discussing the nuance in this science conversation because i'm afraid when i talk about how this is a really nuanced problem, it adds fuel to them saying it happened years ago. all of a sudden the climate deniers say this can't possibly be global warming. >> they use the advantage of science, which is we're not certain about everything. we do experimentation and give you a parameter within which things can happen, an explanation, and we have hypothesis theories, and they go aha you don't know. i know because god told me. god turns out to be the koch brothers right? >> i'm loving all of the tweets, you know sandy is god's way of... i actually sent out a tweet last night it's not god's way of anything. nature has no agenda here. >> we're used to that. these big storms have always been accompanied by those who want to attribute it to a divine course. that's absurd on its face. i don't know what to say to that. >> thank you guys, actually come back and stay with us and we'll have more discussions about the ramifications later
for it. -- to work for it. [applause] we should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. change comes when we live up to america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
help doctors pinpoint those with the highest risk. abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable, but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> a lot of radiation. ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> it includes prescreening patients with a cardio stress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto
of man-made global warming is a hoax. >> the science is bad. >> unproven science. >> that has yet to be proven and i highly doubt it's going to happen any time soon. >> still a scientific theory that has not been proven. >> cenk: that's the media. that's the republicans. when you turn to the democrats i wish i had good news for you. but president obama hasn't been that much better in his results. now he was recently on mtv kind of like candy crowly, he views it as a niche-type-of-topic. >> obama: we're not moving as fast as we need to. this is an issue that further generations, mtv viewers are going to have to be dealing with, even more than the older generation. this is a critical issue. there is a huge contrast in this campaign between myself and governor romney. i'm surprised it didn't come up in one of the debates. >> cenk: here's how it could have come up, if you brought it up. did you notice, you mtv viewers i guess you care about this because you'll be around when things get really bad. although things are getting bad now. and he said he has a much different record than mit
-- the national academy of sciences, the journal, proceedings of the national academy of sciences took a survey of scientists who work on this a couple of years ago, and there was agreement among 97% of scientists that fossil fuel emissions from human activity lead to global warming. are warming the atmosphere. that's an incredibly high consensus. so it's 97% in agreement. 3% in disagreement. at this consensus. at this point the scientific consensus is very, very strong that burning coal and oil and fossil fuels is warming the planet and leading to these extreme weather situations. >> so, this question really, then, is directed to the 3% of scientists as we look at the latest cover of "business week" it speaks for itself, coral, we had new york city mayor michael bloomberg endorsing the president in a piece largely focused on climate change. is this a wake-up call and could it end the debate? >> the problem is you can't ever say any one specific weather event is caused by climate change but you can look at the growing stack of reports saying we know we're going to see more of this. the national
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
to his last which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> here is this a shot from 31st and lake shore drive that he took at 3:00 and a gorgeous polestar sunrise from rosewood beach highland park illinois but we thought we would go up to lake superior this time we have seen these images who is a meteorologist and she is one of our former intern's and look at these shots from dust and both of the waves on lake superior and the snow dustin tells us he is already tired of the snow but you have a long winter ahead of you because it's only starting beautiful shots though. the first signs that the light northeast wind and a 25 degree temperature drop you need a 15 degree drops so that clouds conform. in a month that is almost 11 degrees cooler than november last year we are averaging 42.5 degrees. today for instance we have a high of 48. but we have averaged about 5 degrees below normal. look at these temperatures down in texas and oklahoma while the child grows up to the northeast part of the reason for that and these are current temperatures look at
are at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to come down here and enjoy the great science festival and you want to do that, hey, we have some great weather outside today. it looks like things will stay dry. the temperatures running a little bit cool, 40s and 50s now, but by the afternoon, high pressure taking over. and the temperatures warming up. we're planning on 60s and 70s. much improved weather throughout the weekend. high pressure bringing some 80s by sunday and monday. then cooling off toward the middle of next week. >>> as superstorm sandy bears down on new jersey, delta airlines starts moving planes and people all over the country. >> it's orderly. we know exactly where they're going and it's clean. >> we'll go inside the operations control center this morning to show you how delta shut down service, then restarted it after the storm. >>> and two top intelligence officials from afghanistan came to washington for a training course. then they disappeared. so where did they go and are they a threat? former intelligence insider john miller has some answers only on "cb
that you can. so, we use those kinds of principles that are basically at the heart of a lot of science to be able to do this somewhat miraculous feet producing an accurate representation by just talking with a small fraction. host: are they accurate? guest: well, they are. polling has a very good track record of accurately predicting the elections even though that is not our main purpose. is one way we can know that polls are accurate. in fact, of all the surveys that are done it is one of the only ones that has a very clear outside way to validate all the polsters including the pew will do a final poll and put the estimates out the next week or so before the election and on election day we will find out how accurate we were. four years ago we were within one point of picking the exact mark. eight years ago we were dead on the margin. and we are not the only ones that have a good track record. most polling does a very good job of predicting how the election will turn out. host: how do you a do a poll from the beginning to the end? guest: it is a fairly straightforward process. we do se
believes in science and does not scoff at the idea of climate change and has taken concrete action to combat it, mr. bloomberg said the choice to him is clear. "one sees climate change as an urgent problem that threatens our planet. one does not. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." this endorsement criticized mitt romney's leadership on the other hand saying, "in the past mr. romney has also taken sensible positions, but he has reversed course on all of them and is even running against the health care model he signed into law in massachusetts." mike bloomberg criticizes mr. romney specifically for flip-flopping and dropping his previous positions on climate change then says, "this issue is too important. we need determined leadership at the national level." in other words, i don't think we're going to get determined leadership from mitt romney. i think he has taken occasionally attractive positions, but leadership, no. speaking to you from new york city, this storm and its aftermath, this externality to the big election i
science to get in the way of politics but the obama administration hasn't been out front on the issue either. we will talk mother nature's revenge when chris hayes joins us just ahead. i don't spend money on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop t
kind of promise and the political sciences say george bush was the most polarized presidency. it's a condition of life and what obama's hoping is that republicans if he's re-elected sort of collapse a little bit in exhaustion and work with him in a short period of time. >> and regardless if it's a popular electoral split, it's going to be close. almost 50% of the country will feel disenchanted with whoever is elected. and the fault lines will be quite amazing. >> let's talk about where we were last week. it felt like there was momentum in mitt romney's direction. where are they tonight? >> there was some momentum still building off that successful denver debate. and then it sort of hit the reality of two more debates after that and the continuing campaign. and i think that this momentum was starting to slow before the hurricane hit. but certainly the hurricane had a piece of this. the fact that the president gets to look presidential. you had him up there with his bomber jacket in air force one. >> and chris christie of endorsed hip. -- hymn. >> -- endorsed him. >> we talk about
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> our fourth story, a super storm headed for the northeast. hurricane sandy has lost some strength, but forecasters warn that it is extremely powerful. it's left more than 20 dead across the caribbean. now, states florida to massachusetts are bracing for wind sh rain and widespread power outages. chad myers is tracking sandy. this weather system is massive. tell us how big it is, how wide the impact could be. >> it will be all way from maine to north carolina. every state in that area will get some type of damage. the storm now just leaving the bahamas and it will be making its way up to the northeast. we don't know where it's going to go yet. the the models are from rhode island to about washington, d.c., but i will guarantee you this, every place in this circle will have some type of damage. whether it's wind, trees knocked down, powerlines knocked down coastal erosion or flooding. one of our vendors, wtt, said this may be in some spots, a 1,000 year flood. kind of lik
-- >> jennifer: that's the language of science right? >> it isn't really. much of science isn't like that. like anything that i just mentioned about biology economics and so on. but climate scientists are using that incorrectly. there is real systemic causation here. and systemic causation happens when certain things are present. for example you might have multiple causes. you might have a network of causes. you might have feedback groups. all of those really occur in nature. and what happens here is very clear. in hurricane sandy you have a special kind of hurricane that is normal. actually when you have global warming. it is normal because its characterization is it's huge. it has a huge amount of moisture. it has a huge amount of energy that goes into the winds. how does this happen? every climate scientist knows perfectly well that when you have global warming you get more evaporation over the oceans lots more moisture in the air. when that happens you get heat in the oceans. heat transfers in storms into wind
's not a pure science. i have seen remarkable enthusiasm. when you see this kind of enthusiasm, you got people really all pump up. if you think about four years ago, had you the democrats in the same spot. they were so excited about the opportunity. now you see republicans trading places with them. i see republicans a lot more enthusiastic, a lot more excited than i see the democrats right now. the other thing is, i think there is a sense that what has happened in ohio, we balanced our budget. we have cut taxes. we've tamed our regulators, not to the point if they don't see a problem they don't jump on it, they do. we have the toughest regulations on hydraulic fracking in america. it's the regulators and towns and pounds small businesses. they understand we can't keep doing what we've been doing. >> sean: ohio more than any other state has been subjected to president's hope and change and new tone in washington. he was going to part the ways and all this other stuff. they have been subjected to the people in your great state to probably the greatest smear, slander campaign with more money spen
] [ crowd chants u.s.a. ] >> cenk: i love that reaction. hey, what about climate science? u.s.a.! u.s.a.! we're number one! ha ha, take that, climate change. luckily, not everybody's that dense. new cover of business week is it's global warming stupid. we now have the author of that article, assistant managing editor of bloomberg business week joining us now. some believe this cover story is a bit controversial. do you believe it is? >> no, obviously the cover language is meant to get people's attention but if you read the story itself, you see we're playing it right down the middle. the issue here is not to blame climate change for any one particular storm but to say that the conditions in the atmosphere have indisputably changed and as a result of those changes, all storms generally speaking are going to be prone to be more severe and more frequent and we are beginning to see in undeniable terms the price of the warming of the atmosphere, the warming of the ocean waters and the rise of the ocean waters. >> cenk: paul, here's the problem with that. you say it's undeniable, all the scientist
. with advances in science and technology, there's -- health of the mother has been -- has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one's ever died in childbirth, i know what the science is exactly. what to you make of it with these claims now this shouldn't be an exception for life or health of the mother which we know most people honor those exceptions. >> they're simply not true. i thing he's been going to the todd akin school of biology. 1 in 40 pregnancies, women have pre-eclampsia. there are a number of reasons. but the point is this is not what this district is. this is a moderate district of hardworking people, and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodies. and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you so much for coming on "hardball." good luck next week. >>> when we return, let me finish with a word of warning about mitt romney's transformation in the last couple days, you know, to moderate. >>> let me finish tonight with this. it's
the whole man here, you're the senior science journalist for the "huffington post." okay, we we could put walls up, but shouldn't we go to the source of the problem fossil fuels. >> you have to mitigate the effects because in some respects it is a little too late to reverse this problem. but you also want to work as hard as you can to stop it from getting any worse. we can talk about this kind of two degree celsius problem, and we can get to the technical stuff. but the truth is it's already gotten so bad and even if we stopped putting emissions in the atmosphere it will still get worse for many, many years. >> cenk: let's talk about that for a minute. we have thisthere is magical reverse when we need it. it seems that that would be the time. >> they're saying, the scientists will do all that. >> cenk: seriously is there a way to reverse it. >> to reverse climate change? >> cenk: it just times. >> it a function of making sure it doesn't get worse. we are we at that level. >> cenk: that was a hard-hitting ad against mitt romney against climate change. should democrats--that was an outside
% in favor. >> we're talking about 11 fewer days to go ahead and teach the math, the science and the reading. it's important for our students. >> my biggest concern is giving more money to the senators and having them just spend it away. >> prop 30 would raise the state's sale tax and income tax on californians making $250,000 or more. >>> sports of a measure that would require genetically modified foods to be labeled will hold several rallies today in the bay area. supporters said that consumers should be able to choose whether to eat the foods. and opponents say their safe to eat so additional labeling should not be required. they say, if so, the cost will be passed on to the consumer. >>> groundbreaking ceremonies was held for a new food coto the area. and there are plans for other stores to be built in the same shopping center. >>> the california health department is warning people not to eat bulk house farms carrot chips because they could be contaminated to salmonella. they're voluntarily recalling 16-ounce bags of carrot chips with the best if used by dates of november 12th and 13th.
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. vsp members can save on all authentic transitions lenses, including our new transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. >>> obama's ohio fire wall. cnn is out with a new poll in the state tonight with the the president leading mitt romney 50-46 and that's unchange frd the last cnn poll in ohio taken just avenue the first debate. john king has been looking at the latest numbers. what else does it tell you? >> it's important to look at this poll. thest a small lead. that's yet another poll the president's kept that narrow lead in ohio. you mentioned the horse race. here's one of the biggest factors. in a battleground state like this, the president's getting the democrats, romney's getting a republic
to study. math and science. and english. exactly, yeah. i did not go to university, but being able to help them, i feel excited. >> i am going to be an accountant. >> i'm going to be a lawyer. >> and i'm going to be a nurse. >> the work that we're doing here is bringing change. >>> if there is one good thing about this storm it's that you can get evacuation information, all kinds of information through a lot of different sources. i'm going to tell you how you can do that online. we're downstairs in the cnn newsline. usually not that busy on a sunday night. we brought some people in. tom, one of the managers, and devon, i'm sorry, i had your e-mail up on the air. now he's getting random e-mails from everywhere. stop e-mailing devon. you can get information from tv news conferences, twitter feeds. we want to go to cnn's lori sau segall standing by for us in new york. >> reporter: a lot of people going to nyc.gov. i would say go to wnyc, this is important if you're in the new york area, in the northeast region, you can really look at the different zones. see what zone you're in. i went to it
the art and science of prediction and the signal and the noise, by so many predictions, why so many predictions fail and some don't i am pleased to have nate silver back at this table, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> so where do you based on your polling, see the presidential race at this moment? >> we have obama as a modest favorite still and i should say it is not my polling what we go is look at evyone easels poll and average them together and think about the electorial college if you look at ohio still, obama is ahead in most polls of ohio he is ahead in most polls of iowa, wisconsin, and nevada as well and those four states. >> rose: by two or three points. >> two or three-point not an overwhelming margin but you can look historically and how often does a candidate who has a two or three-point lead in an election, does he how often does he convert that to a win and the answer is about 75 percent of the time. >> rose: so you said 75 percent likely obama will be elected? >> that's right because the states are what w call the tipping pot states tt would swing the electorial col
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
in the science. the science of climate change does not consider the sun. the sun is very potent, a very potent aspect of our climate. that is the problem. the sun travels around the black hole in the center of the galaxy and it takes millions of years. each part of this journey has a different results. host: here's more images for you from the newspapers this morning on the aftermath of this storm. here is the new york post, freight in a storm for travelers shows a picture -- franenstorm. and here is the new york post with images of a fleet of the taxicabs sittings of march and a parking lot yesterday in hoboken, new jersey. and the front page of the new trailpost, frankenstorm's of ruin and despair. any despair in queens yesterday. in sacramento, calif., on our line for democrats, go ahead. . caller: i go back to a comment made by one of the candidates. this was an regard to a woman [indiscernible] i was wondering if the same person would think it is an act of god also. thank you. host: that was wesley in sacramento. let me give the political articles before we conclude here. this is the fron
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to our continuing coverage of the aftermath of hurricane sandy. we keep getting new pictures that show this storm's strength. different prospectives from people in their own homes. here's some incredible video of the winds uprooting a tree on or in a backyard of the north shore of long island. it takes a few seconds. but as you can see right there, you can already see the ground starting to move. it's obviously a very old tree. just take a look and listen. >> uh-oh. uh-oh. >> so sad to see. the root system in that tree very far spread out. sandy still hitting parts of west virginia hard tonight. with snow, though, not rain. heavy, wet snow, weighing down trees, knocking down power lines. utility companies say more than 340,000 customers are without power. some areas of the state under a blizzard warning tonight. one death is being reported so far there. martin savidge joins us from west virginia. martin, the conditions you've been seeing for the last --
, science, research. and guess what? plenty of folks running for congress at the time said it would hurt the economy. that it would kill jobs. and if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for president right now. and it turns out, their math was just as bad back then as it is today because, by the end of bill clin totoclinton's turn am created 23 million jobs. the biggest surplus in our history. wisconsin we know the ideas that work. we also know the ideas that don't work. because in the eight years after bill clinton left office his policies were reversed. the wealthiest americans got tax cuts they didn't need, and that we couldn't afford. companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas, insurance companies, oil companies, wall street given free license do what they pleased. folks, at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us. and result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, record deficits, smallest job growth in a half century and economic crisis that we've been cleaning up for the last four y
as health of the mother, same thing with the science of technology, health of the mother has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one that has ever died in child birth. i don't know what the science is. what do you make of the claims and most people are. >> that's not true. he's been going to the todd akin school of biology, to be honest. in fact, one in 40 pregnancies are he can topic pregnancy where the fertilize tube and results in the loss of the fetus if you don't -- to save the life of the mother. women who have cancer and need chemotherapy, there's a number of reasons. but the point is, this is not where this district is. it's a moderate district of hardworking people and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodieses and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you. >>> when we return, mitt romney's amazing transformation, you know, to moderate. you're watching "hardball," a place for politics. ♪ this will literally probably never happen
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 244 (some duplicates have been removed)